Tuesday, 17 September 2019

Tynemouth

Hello

Thanks for calling in.

It's amazing what you can fit into a couple of days, even without a car!  Newcastle's Metro began operation in 1980 and was the ideal mode of transport to get us to the seaside at Tynemouth, the mouth of the Great 73 mile long Tyne River, so vital for the coalmining and shipbuilding industries.  There was none of the crush of London's tube and we were there in about 20 minutes, arriving at a glorious station obviously used to hoards of visitors, possibly for its weekend markets and which looks a lot older than it is.  I found some street art too.



The pretty town was festooned with bunting.


Surprisingly, the church had been turned into the Green Ginger Arcade full of shops and cafes.



At the end of the street, the grassy moat leads up to the motte where the 7th Century Castle and Priory sit, right on the coast. Three Kings have been buried there - Oswin, King of Deira (651), Osred II, King of Northumbria (792) and Malcolm III, King of Scots.










There are fabulous wide sandy beaches and a pier complete with lighthouse.  It's my kind of pier made of solid stone with none of those gaps you get with wooden slats.  It took 40 years to build.





You can see four lighthouses, in fact, the red and white one in the distance is the National Trust's Souter Lighthouse at South Shields.



Looking back at the land, a monument to Lord Collingwood, who was Nelson's second in command at the Battle of Trafalgar and is buried at St Paul's Cathedral in London, surveys the sea from his tall column, flanked by four canons from his Ship The Royal Sovereign and a seagull (there's always one!)





A couple of other famous names who both attended the Kings Priory School, previously known as the Kings School, were Stan Laurel and Ridley Scott (not at the same time though!) and Giuseppe Garibaldi also visited the town.

Luckily,  there's an excellent path along the River to North Shields which we'll take next time as we watch the large ships enter the River and head off down the Tyne.


Cheerio

8 comments:

  1. Doesn't it look pretty with all that bunting? What a great day out, I bet there's plenty to fill a day, and more, with there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, there was loads to do. Archie would have enjoyed some grwat walks along the River and the coast.

      Delete
  2. You certainly make the most of your time when you go on a trip and it was interesting to see Tynemouth. Our local daughter M talks about it as she goes to see her friend. (She lived in Durham and now lives and works in Newcastle-on-Tyne). We took our grandchildren there - quite a while ago now. We went further along and walked to a different lighthouse. The town looks appealing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I expect that's St Mary's lighthouse off to the other side heading to Cullercoats, I have a very blurry photo of it! There are lots of cafes in Tynemouth, great places for blustery days!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it was St. Mary's. There's a walkway across to the lighthouse, but we didn't get across to take a look as the sea was coming in. The grands enjoyed the sandy beach and the picnic on a grassy bank. We must go back sometime!

      Delete
    2. What fun and great memories too.

      Delete
  4. You certainly packed in a lot during your visit, so much to see and take in. I like the pier and it does look solid and reliable. I remember travelling on the Metro from Newcastle to Gateshead for the National Garden Festival some time in the mid 80s. We'd arrived by rail in Newcastle from Peterborough:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's quite easy by train I find and the metro was nice and quick and quite empty too. 🙂 I think I went to the National Garden Festival too I'd forgotten it was in that neck of the woods. 🙂

      Delete