Friday, 23 August 2019

Five at Wallingford Castle

Hello

Lovely to see you!

We've spent the week here on the blog in Wallingford, enjoying the town, river and museum and here's the last post, this time featuring the castle.

1.  Wallingford Castle was built on a motte in the 11th Century on the orders of William the Conqueror which became the most prominent castle in Southern England.  It was Empress Matilda's stronghold in the 12th Century during the Civil War with King Stephen.  The town's Charter was granted by her son, Henry II in 1155 in recognition of the town's support, the second town in England to receive such an honour.  There were many royal inhabitants over the years - King John, Henry III's brother Richard, Edward the Black Prince and his wife Joan, Henry V's widow, Catherine de Valois, Henry VI and his guardian Owen Tudor, grandfather of Henry VII.  The Castle was Royalist during the Civil War.  It withstood a 12 week siege in 1646 before surrendering to Parliament and was demolished on Cromwell's orders in 1652.

2.  What's left today are the earthworks on which the walls stood, two fragments of walls and the ruins of the medieval College of Saint Nicholas.






3.  The Castle Gardens are a peaceful park to sit and ponder.  They are well looked after with a rose bed in amongst the varied trees on the different levels.






4.  The meadow is now a peaceful area, ideal for wildlife and visitors alike and include two rare floodplain meadows.


5.  Wallingford's Coat of Arms was granted in 1955 to commemorate the 800th Anniversary of the town's Charter.


Have a great weekend.

Cheerio

8 comments:

  1. Thank-you … I did enjoy this post about Wallingford Castle, it looks a very interesting place to visit.

    Enjoy the Bank Holiday Weekend.

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jan. It's a pity there isn't more of the castle left but it is a wonderfully peaceful spot. Have fun.

      Delete
  2. I've enjoyed the visit to Wallingford this week with lots of interesting information about the history and surrounding environment. I hope the meadows continue to thrive under more traditional methods of management. It would be good to see the rarer wild creatures return there too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's good, I'm glad you enjoyed it. It's definitely the way to go to encourage the wild creatures and plants to return.

      Delete
  3. Looks a lovely place to visit and so well kept. An interesting history too:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would have been great to see a few more ruins but to have such a large area of meadow by the river is marvellous. 🙂

      Delete
  4. It's such a shame that so many of our castles are no longer standing but I'm pleased that the history is being kept alive. It looks like a beautiful place to visit with the gardens and meadows.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If it wasn't Henry VIII then it was Oliver Cromwell , they have done their best to change the face of the country when it comes to all those fabulous buildings.

      Delete