Tuesday, 29 August 2017

Norwegian church

Hello

Thanks for dropping in.

Last time we walked round Cardiff Bay and spotted the Norwegian Church across the water.  It's a bit of a shame that a white temporary building had been erected next to it as it rather spoilt the effect.

Still, it's a bit unusual to see a Norwegian Church in Wales. What's it all about?

With Cardiff being a major port in the 1800s, the Norwegian merchant fleet did a lot of its business there so in 1868 the Norwegian Seaman's Mission built a church as a meeting place and a home from home for the sailors and those Norwegians that were living there and later for those who couldn't return to Norway during WW2 due to Nazi occupation.  




The iron clad building was added to over the years and used for many events.

The author Roald Dahl was born in Llandaff near Cardiff to Norwegian parents and was christened in the church in 1916 as were his three sisters.

Over the years it fell into decline  and by 1974, it was closed and deconsecrated.  Roald Dahl campaigned to save it and became the first President of the Preservation Trust.  The church was dismantled in 1987 and re-erected on its present site in 1992.


Nowadays, it is an arts centre and cafΓ©.



Ronald Dahl is celebrated there every September.

It's such an attractive building, isn't it.

Cheerio

16 comments:

  1. I've enjoyed catching up on your Cardiff posts. This church looks wonderful, so glad it was saved even though it had to be moved. Interesting too about the Roald Dahl connection:)

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    1. That's good. They didn't move it too far as I think it was where the Millennium Centre is now, so that wasn't too bad. It's such a great landmark. 😊

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  2. Such a shame that it had to be moved but at least it was saved, such a wonderful old building.

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  3. It's a beautiful building. I especially like the rose window and the stained glass window with the fish patterns. It's good that it was saved and is still used.

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    1. I'm glad you can see the fish in the window as they looked particularly good but the poor old camera struggles with those lighting conditions.

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    2. My eyesight isn't so good, but your slideshow pics always come up large on my desk flat screen attached to my laptop so I do enjoy the detail in your photos.

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    3. That's good, I'm pleased about that. Sometimes the photos come out a bit dark so I hope they look ok as well.

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  4. What a lovely building. It's a shame it isn't still used for its intended purpose though but at least it was saved.

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    1. That's true but I suppose times changed and it wasn't needed in the same way. It was very well patronised though. Sadly we were a bit late to have a cup of tea.

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  5. I had no idea the Norwegians travelled so much until one of my Aussie friends who Grandparents are from Norway filled me in. This Church is so pristine looking isn't it? It would just draw you in, I expect the coffee shop was good too?
    Wren x

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    1. The coffee shop did look good but it was closing as we arrived - it took us a bit longer than we thought to make it round the bay. x

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  6. Wow, I found this so interesting. Being a member of the Daughters of Norway, I'm familiar with the Seaman's Church. They still have active churches all over the globe. The closest one to me is in San Pedro, California. Pat :)

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    1. That is interesting, thanks for letting me know, Pat. It's beautiful isn't it. x

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  7. I love this! I read many of the Ronald Dahl books to my kids.

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  8. That's good, so pleased. They are great books aren't they.

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