Monday, 17 July 2017

The Vyne

Hello

Thanks for calling in.

Like Jan from Jan's Ramblings, we've paid a visit to The Vyne, a National Trust property near Basingstoke, to have a look at their roof walkway whilst the scaffolding is up and the roof renovation project is in progress. It took three months to erect the scaffolding before they could get cracking.




Walking up the stairs, 74 steps, rather than going in the makeshift lift, the first thing that strikes you is that there are loads of pitched roofs, not just the one big one, over a much larger area than is apparent from the ground.



Lead was being hammered into position on the first roof, a change in material from the original slate due to it being unsuitable for efficient drainage . How neat it all looked.  Little gaps were being left in the roofing felt for the bats to be able to get in, as well as bat boxes placed here and there.


The little white frilly edged strip on the black felt is to enable the bats to get in and out. The metal strip is the lightening conductor.



The pitch of the roof below had to be changed as it was too steep and the rain water would just whoosh down, the newly secured wood had to be taken off and redone.


The new tiles ready to be laid.  Visitors can write a message on a tile for a donation. Great to think the message might be found when the roof next needs repairing.





There was a good view of the garden from above.



Throughout the building work, the ground floor of the house has been open although the rooms have been disturbed and unexpected collections are on display together with music and video displays.  A great deal of care has been taken that objects and the house interior are kept safe from all the banging and hammering.  It is supposed to be back to normal by December but that looks a tall order but completing the work to the highest level should take precedence rather than rushing.  Work over the important chapel with its beautiful stained glass windows featuring Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, doesn't start till October.

Time for a cheese scone I think.


If you'd like to have a look at this historic Tudor house, which was visited by King Henry VIII, before the work, here's a link to one of my previous posts.

There's an interesting story about a ring which is on display which I'll tell you about another time.

Cheerio

10 comments:

  1. It's lovely to get to see places that are normally out of bounds. It's many years since I visited The Vyne, so it was good to see your photos. B x

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    1. It is! I always want to look behind the doors in these lovely houses but sometimes you can be disappointed as it's just hiding an office or a big mess!

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  2. I would not be able to take myself up to the roof - heights! - so it is great to see your photos and hear about it, then I can still enjoy it from the ground!!

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    1. Ha! It wasn't so bad though I was glad to hold on to the handrail!

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  3. Back in the 90's when we visited London they were working on the roof of Westminster Abbey and they were letting people go up for a view. I'm scared of heights so I didn't go, but my husband did.

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    1. That sounds a long way up, I'm not sure I'd have made it either!

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  4. Fabulous. I love the way they allow people up to see the work being done. When we visited Croome Park near Worcester a couple of years ago the NT had done a similar thing and you could climb gently to the roof level via the scaffolding steps to see all the different levels and look over the grounds below:)

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    1. That does sound very much the same, it's so interesting isn't it. Good old National Trust!

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  5. Not sure I would want to be that high but wonderful to see everything through your eyes.

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    1. It didn't seem too high as the building was wrapped up with a plastic coat so you couldn't see too far down thank goodness.

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