Friday, 27 January 2017

Five on Friday - More than Meets the Eye in Henley


Hello

Thanks for calling in.

We are joining Amy for Five on Friday today.  Finding some places which had more to them than met the eye on my visit to Henley this week, I am going to share them with you now. 


One -  Friar Park

High on the hill overlooking Henley-on-Thames, you come across the entrance to Friar Park a 120-bedroomed mansion, which was built in 1899 for eccentric solicitor Sir Frank Crisp.  You can't see the house itself from the entrance but, according to the Henley Guide, it is an architectural fantasy in red brick, stone and terracotta all extravagantly mixed together.  Throughout the house, friars are used as decorative motifs, some with moveable noses to switch on the lights! Ha!  Within the 62 acre garden is a scale model of the Matterhorn with waterfalls, bridges, gnomes, stepping stones and grottos.  Eventually it became the home of Musician and former Beatle, George Harrison in 1970 and he lived there until his death in 2001. 



Two - Ice age 

Resting in a small garden not far from the gates of Friar Park, this stone formed by the compression of clay and pebbles, is called a  pudding stone and is a relic of the Ice Age.  When commercially quarried and polished, the mottled red 'marble' was used to make kitchen worktops.


Three - Apple

In the same garden is this painted apple.  Henley is twinned with Leichlingen in Germany which is known for growing apples and berries.  The town is also shown on the painted apple so I suppose it marks the twinning of the two towns.



Four - Anne Boleyn Cottage

Halfway along New Street, you come across Anne Boleyn Cottage amidst the pretty half-timbered houses. It may have been named that in Victorian times but could pre-date King Henry VIII's second wife by 100 years.  Interestingly, the door has many filled in holes where locks would have been, as in those times, keys and locks were removed and taken to the new house when the occupant moved.




Five - Brakspears

Many original features of the 300 year old Brakspear Brewery have been retained in the buildings where beer was brewed for their 150 pubs and supplied to hundreds of others, even though it is now a hotel. A 200ft artesian well in the brewery provided 38 million gallons of spring water annually. The malthouse across the road has been converted to apartments but they give a suggestion of what used to be on the site.





I hope you enjoyed these rather unexpected places of interest in Henley.

Cheerio

30 comments:

  1. You really did have a wonderful time in Henley. What a fascinating place. Loved how they took their keys with them and the next occupant filled in the key hole :) B x

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    1. I hadn't heard about that before, the guide was great about these little details. x

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  2. Anything...ANYTHING having to do with King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn piques my interest!

    And that's correct?--- you say 120 bedrooms. Imagine making up the beds and changing the linens...that would entail hiring a LOT of servants. lol

    Extremely interesting post Karen.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it. I don't know what people do with such huge houses, It's bad enough keeping a small one shipshape.

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  3. I've never been to Henley. It looks wonderful. I'm always on the lookout for places to visit, or to call in to break longer journeys. Henley might be worth a special trip.

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    1. It is beautiful but a long way for you. Most of the towns on the Thames are gorgeous and have a lot of history.

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  4. I enjoyed living vicariously through your post today! I love to travel and see new things :)

    I hope you can stop by:

    http://collettaskitchensink.blogspot.com/2017/01/tea-time-report-cards-and-stationary.html

    Colletta

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it. Have a great weekend.

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  5. A fascinating five. How amazing Anne Boleyn's door has survived all those years and is still in use today.

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    1. The door does look old. I wonder if Anne Boleyn ever saw it or whether the cottage was just named after her. Her niece lived in Greys Court just outside Henley.

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  6. Lovely to see some more of your visit to Henley. I had no idea about Anne Boleyn's place! It has been really great to see more of it with you taking us around.

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    1. I don't think Anne Boleyn actually lived there, more that the cottage was named after her. Mind you, Lady Catherine Knollys who lived at Greys Court was the daughter of Anne's sister Mary Boleyn. x

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  7. You always take me to new places!
    Wow, I wish I could stay one night in the old building ....!Very pretty. Have a happy weekend,Crimson.

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    1. It looks very inviting doesn't it. Thanks, you too.

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  8. I forgot to say. Your header is lovely. It is sliding!!

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    1. It's my instagram feed. I was trying to put one or two photos in but they all move along. Ha!

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  9. Good five, I've often wondered where Firiar's Park was, does his widow still live there?

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    1. I think so too but I imagine she would have a few houses to choose from.

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  10. Friar's Park sounds like it was built by someone quite eccentric. A miniature Matterhorn would certainly make a garden focal point. The Anne Boleyn cottage is charming, even if she never lived there. It's interesting that people took their locks with them.

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    1. I would be quite interested to see the light switches!

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  11. Another lovely post, Karen, thank you. I am fascinated by that pudding stone. x

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    1. I couldn't find anymore information about it sadly. How did it get there?! x

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  12. A very enjoyable tour. Thank you very much!

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  13. Your post brought back happy memories of a visit to this town some years ago. I really enjoyed walking along the river , I wish I'd seen the pudding stone - very interesting!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed a trip down memory lane!

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  14. Very interesting post. 120 bedrooms! I'd hate to clean all of those! LOL! Very interesting that George Harrison lived there. I love that apple! What a great idea, wish I could paint. I love simple historic facts, like the locks on the doors. I wonder when they decided it would be easier to exchange keys!!!

    Cindy

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    1. I enjoyed my trip, the guide book was so interesting with all these little details. I always head for a tourist information office and collect their leaflets. Glad you enjoyed it.

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