Wednesday, 6 April 2016

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson

Hello

Barbara at Coastal Ripples is hosting her Paint Monthly link up and as we have moved into April now, I have been wondering which artist to feature. The John Piper exhibition in Hastings at the Jerwood Gallery wasn't showing any of my favourite paintings and I am not a fan of John Bratby's work that was also on display. So when I was in Reading the other day I called into the Art Gallery where the exhibition A Sense of Place was still showing, I've already told you about it here and here.

This time I selected a painting by Christopher Nevinson and then found out a bit more about him when I got home.

View of the Sussex Weald
Isn't it just beautiful!

Nevinson was one of the most famous WWI war artists, although you can't tell from the painting in the Reading Art Gallery. Towards the end of his life he concentrated on pastoral subjects which I suppose is a natural response to having seen such atrocities in his earlier life.

Born in 1889, he studied at the Slade, alongside Stanley Spencer, and the Academie Julian in Paris where he met and was influenced by Futurist artists and became the outstanding British exponent of the art. He worked with the Red Cross and as an Ambulance Driver in France during WWI until he was invalided out and in 1917 became an official war artist. His bleak scenes from the Front caused a stir and he was the first to paint scenes from the air.

After the war he painted traditional scenes of landscapes and cityscapes of London, Paris and New York not connected to any particular art movement and after 1925 travelled round Southern England painting landscapes and flowers.

He died in 1946.

On the Downs


La Mitrailleuse

Ypres After the First Bombardment

The Arrival - in this picture he shows views that are happening simultaneously.



If you put his name into Google you will be able to see a lot more of his pictures and find out more about him but I hope this has just given you something to investigate further. I found it quite difficult to choose which paintings I should include on this page as I liked so many of them.

Cheerio

10 comments:

  1. The paintings of corylus and meadow are beautiful. Interesting that he painted also in cubistic style. Now I'll google him! Thank you Karen!

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    1. Quite a wide repertoire of styles and all really well executed aren't they. :-)

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  2. Thanks for joining in again Karen. Christopher Nevinson is not an artist I know. What contrasting styles. I love his cubist style from the war but his more pastoral scenes are equally excellent. The painting on the downs is quite idyllic. I will definitely research him and find out more. Barbara x

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    1. Pleasure, Barbara. I'm glad the Art Gallery has some great paintings on show at the moment. x

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  3. Thank you for this beautiful post, Karen! What a contrast indeed between his landscapes and the war scenes!
    I love On the Downs. I can almost feel the wind and hear the wheat waving.

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    1. It's the poppies isn't it! I can't resist a poppy! :-)

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  4. How interesting! I love his pastoral paintings, the meadow is gorgeous as is your choice. I also like the cubist style he used for the war paintings as it fits exactly the way life must have seemed fractured and discordant for many people at the front and elsewhere too. I see he lived through two world wars. I think those people who lived through the first war must have been so devastated and disappointed for there to be another:)

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    1. We don't realise how lucky we are now do we. Although he was celebrated for his war paintings, I like the landscapes as it looks like he found some peace there. :-)

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  5. It is interesting that he studied with Stanley Spencer as I can see a lot of similarity in their work, in fact when I quickly glanced at the first picture - before the war ones - I thought it was his work. Thank you for sharing more about him and introducing me to a new artist! xx

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    1. Stanley Spencer's landscapes are great, so much detail and funny to think he'd just start off painting a tiny flower and build the rest of the painting round it. x

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