Friday, 11 March 2016

Five on Friday - Wellington

Hello

Have you had a good week? I hope so.  I've been in an historical mood myself.  I didn't start off that way, it just sort of happened when I came across a couple of local places that I wanted to find out more about.  As I looked up one place, another place required investigation until today I feel I have to give you five things to do with the Duke of Wellington.

One - The Duke



Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, sometimes known as the Iron Duke was a soldier, statesman, national hero and Prime Minister most famous for defeating Napoleon in 1815 at the Battle of Waterloo amongst his many other achievements.  He attended Eton for three years, which I visited recently.

Two - Stratfield Saye House


Stratfield Saye was bought for the Duke in 1817 and his family continue to live there to this day.  The house was chosen for its location being near London and Windsor. He was going to build a huge new 'Waterloo Palace' to rival Blenheim but didn't carry out the plans as they were too expensive.  The grounds are very pleasant, Copenhagen his chestnut stallion retired there and was ridden round the grounds for many years and is also buried there. You can also see an exhibition within which is the enormous carriage made for his funeral. Guided tours, which are very informative, are available during Easter and the Summer only.


Three - Apsley House



Known as Number 1, London, Apsley House was bought by the Duke in 1817 from his older brother Richard who had run into financial difficulties. He enlarged it and turned it into a magnificent residence full of paintings, silver and porcelain.  The Waterloo Gallery, an extension to the house, was used for the annual Waterloo Banquets to commemorate the Battle.  Wellington received many gifts from Tsars, Emperors and Kings which are on display.  At the bottom of the stairs is an 11 foot sculpture of Napoleon posing as Mars, God of War bought by the British Government and presented to the Duke.

Four -Walmer Castle, Kent



The Duke died at Walmer Castle aged 83, where he lived for 23 years as the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.  I haven't visited the Castle, but looking at the website, I think I will have to call in if I am nearby.

Five - Wellington Boots or Wellies



Wellington Boots were an invention of the Duke's, adapting a hessian boot of the day.  Here's a link with all the info.


My local area has many references to the Duke - street names, the college, memorials, parks, stations etc. due to him having lived at Stratfield Saye.  Tomorrow I'll tell you about one of the roads!

Thanks to Amy for the Five on Friday link-up and thanks to you for calling in.

Cheerio

41 comments:

  1. Thank you for those facts. You are in a history mood this week! I have been to Apsley house. Well worth the visit. I will have to try and get to Stratfield Saye house. That's a new one to me. Have a good weekend. B X

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    1. I rather liked all the stoneware columns inside, really colourful. x

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  2. I've spent many a happy hour with family and friends in Wellington Country Park. I wonder if it's still the same these days? I've wanted to revisit stratfield Saye House when down that way so thanks for mentioning that it's not always open. Looking into my family history I found out that my great grandfather had been a stable boy there before moving later on to Reading. I always enjoy your posts and the history ones are full of interesting facts.

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    1. Oh how interesting! I'm sure you'd enjoy a visit to the House, the Guide had lots to tell us about, plus there's a farm shop and cafe too. I haven't been to the park since the children were small as I think they started to charge a lot to go in, not sure about these days though. Thanks

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  3. The only fact I knew was about the Wellie boots, so a great post where I have learnt something new. Take care and thank you for sharing.

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  4. Fantastic post, adding the Kent Castle to my list of (semi) local places to visit

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    1. It looks good doesn't it and was supposed to be his favourite residence. :-)

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  5. Hi Karen
    Did you see Phil's Bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo Bicentenary Exhibition last year?
    We were on a dog walk on Monday and came across The Wellington Memorial Statue in Aldershot.
    It had originally been design for on top of Marble Arch, moved to Hyde Park and then to Aldershot

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    1. No I missed it unfortunately but I saw your photos on Facebook and I haven't seen the statue in Aldershot either! Oh dear, I'll have to go and have a look. Here's so much round here isn't there. x

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  6. Wellington's one of those people you think you know until you actually need to say something about him. Then you realise you don't know much at all! Nice five things.

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    1. Thanks, there is so much to say really but I've just written a little. :-)

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  7. I love reading your history posts, I have learnt so much. Stratfield Saye is not too far for me and your post has made me want to visit. xx

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    1. Thanks Jan. I enjoyed my visit there but do check the opening times before you set off. x

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  8. Five fascinating facts about the Iron Duke. All his former homes look fascinating. I remember having to learn all the battles from the Peninisular Wars at school:)

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    1. Well done you! You can probably still remember them now I expect, that sort of thing seems to stick doesn't it. :-)

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  9. How interesting, those houses look amazing to visit.
    Jill

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  10. You have written another very informative post to share. I loved reading this and learning about the Duke of Wellington. I especially enjoyed the part about the boots. Wishing you the best, Pat xx

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  11. Very informative five. I'd like to visit a few of those properties! I didn't realize wellies are connected to the Duke of Wellington. Got to use some wellies this past weekend while mucking about in daffodil fields! Have a lovely weekend.

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    1. Ha ha it's been quite wet here too and not too many blue skies either. :-)

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  12. The Duke was a jolly fellow and quite important, too. I enjoyed learning more about him.

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  13. He was a very interesting man wasn't he. Thank goodness for his invention of wellington boots, where would we be without them hey!! Thank you for joining Five On Friday, I hope that you have a good weekend! xx

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    1. Thanks Amy, you too. I'm quite glad of a cardigan too - good old Earl of Cardigan! x

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  14. Great photos, interesting blog.

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  15. What a wonderful Historic Five giving great info about the Duke of Wellington! Enjoyed it so much.

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  16. So interesting! Thanks for sharing Sweetie. ;) I especially love the boot photo. Lol So that's where wellies were named. I always wondered why they were called that. Have a great weekend!! Xoxo

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    1. Thanks Carrie, glad you enjoyed it x

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  17. Fascinating history about the Duke, his life, homes and even his horse! I always wondered why they called boots, 'Wellies' and now I know! Stratfield Saye House is beautiful. Thanks for the fun history lesson! x Karen

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  18. Fascinating history about the Duke, his life, homes and even his horse! I always wondered why they called boots, 'Wellies' and now I know! Stratfield Saye House is beautiful. Thanks for the fun history lesson! x Karen

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    1. Ha ha thanks Karen, glad you enjoyed it. We're so lucky round here, there are so many historic places. x

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  19. A wonderful five this week! Incredible homes & wealth He was a gifted statesman!
    Thanks for this very interesting post!

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    1. Pleasure, how the other half live, it's always interesting to have a look isn't it :-)

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  20. He was an interesting character! This happens to me too, I see something and have to find out more. I work in the Cotton industry in real life and I recently came across an old contract concerning a middle passage - when I researched it further, I was truly sorry I had, it was about the slave trade! Anyway, I digress, a great five Karen xx

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    1. It is interesting though, especially if it concerns your locality, it means so much more. Have a good week x

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  21. What a fascinating character - I believe there's a statue of him outside the Royal Exchange in London too.

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