Monday, 24 August 2015

Mosaic Monday Around Reading

Hello

It's nice to see you again and many thanks for all your kind messages.

I hope you've all had a great week, the weather here has been a bit up and down again so when the sun came out with the prospect of a rainy week ahead, I decided to have a trip to Reading and see what wazzup!



The Mosaic shows some of the different types of building around the town situated on the Rivers Thames and Kennet. I have done a few posts about it before, just click on the Reading label above.

The first photo is of the Town Hall designed by Alfred Waterhouse in Victorian Gothic style in 1875 photo nine is a detail from the exterior.  Nowadays it houses Reading Museum, a cafe and concert halls.  Local schools can go back in time to attend a Victorian School all suitably dressed up, the classroom comes complete with slates, ink pens and a stiff and starchy teacher.  Someone will get the cane and another the dunces hat but it's all taken in good part.

Photo eight is in Reading Museum and is a mosaic (very appropriate for today!) taken from a Roman settlement at nearby Silchester - Calleva Atrebatum.

The church featured in the second photo is The Minster Church of St. Mary the Virgin and dates from the 11th Century.  Maybe if you zoom in on the picture you will see it's distinctive chequerboard tower.  During the reign of King Edward IV, it was compulsory for all yeomen in Britain to learn archery.  An archery butts was set up on the land in front of the church for men to train on Sundays, some even fighting in the Battle of Agincourt.  This area is where the town of Reading began. The shops in photo seven are opposite the church.

The tower in the third photo is part of the prison which has now been closed but is famous for housing Oscar Wilde when he wrote his poem The Ballad of Reading Gaol.

The 16 ton cast iron Maiwand lion shown in photo four is a memorial in Forbury Gardens.  Rumours abound that the sculptor, George Blackall Simonds, committed suicide following the realisation that the gait of the lion is wrongly depicted, however he made careful observations of the animals and lived for a further 43 years.

Finally we go all modern in the sixth photo - a recent building is the Blade which has a curving spire on the top - I have inconveniently chopped that off in the picture!  Still you can see it from a distance all around the county.

I shall be doing a few more posts on Reading during the week to show it's other sides.

Thank your for dropping by and many thanks too to Judith for hosting Mosaic Monday.

Cheerio!

17 comments:

  1. Hello, wonderful images of the different buildings. I like the mosaic and the prison tower. The town hall and church is beautiful and the lion is cool. Happy Monday, enjoy your new week!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, glad you liked it. Don't the weeks fly by! :-)

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  2. I've never been to Reading so it was lovely to see your photos which have made up a great mosaic:)

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  3. I love seeing architectural details and different buildings. Such a treat! Happy Monday!

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  4. It is great to see the architecture and history of Reading being celebrated in this way! I think people think it is a modern town with nothing interesting and historical, but you have proved that isn't the case! xx

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    1. Thanks Amy. There's much more there than first meets the eye, not just John Lewis! x

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  5. What beautiful elements to showcase in your mosaic.

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  6. An enlightening post, as we're just getting to know Reading. Some great photos and interesting information!
    Cathy x

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    1. Thanks Cathy. It's easy to think of Reading as a town with modern buildings and plenty of shops isn't it, x

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  7. I am enamoured by the detailed architecture that can be found in Europe and your historical accounts were a pleasure to read.
    Thanks for linking to Mosaic Monday.

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    1. Many thanks Judith. There are all sorts of fantastic buildings around, we are very lucky. :-)

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  8. What a wonderful variety of things to see there. It's such a mix of cultures and architecture.

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    1. Yes, it's surprising what you find when you aren't distracted by the shops!

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